Working Rwandan Mothers Now Eligible for Paid Maternity Leave. Read More

Working Rwandan Mothers Now Eligible for Paid Maternity Leave. Read More




A new scheme guaranteeing the full pay of employed mothers who are on maternity leave in Rwanda is now fully operational. According to the New Times, the Rwanda Social Security Board (RSSB) has approved the scheme requiring mothers to take a three-month paid leave.

The scheme is welcome news to working mothers, who now have the legal right to take care of their infants, while receiving full pay and without fear of losing their jobs.

 

Chantal Mukarutabana, the teachers’ representative at Rwanda Education Trade Union, said that the new scheme is essential in the development and health of both the child and mother.

According to the Rwandan Ministry of Health, pregnant and breastfeeding mothers should improve the nutritional health of their children in the first 1,000 days of their lives, starting from conception.

This was the message behind its 1,000-day sensitization campaign held last year by the Rwanda Biomedical Center.

Empowering Mothers

Under the new scheme, working mothers who have contributed to the plan for at least one month will be eligible to receive benefits.

Both the working mother and her employer are expected to equally contribute to the maternity leave benefits scheme on a monthly basis, totaling 0.6 percent of the employee’s gross working salary.

RSSB, whose role is to implement the scheme, will cover six weeks of the paid leave starting from the seventh week.

All employees and every employer in Rwanda are required to make contributions to the scheme, regardless if they’re in the private or public sector.

According to the provisions of the law, the employer declares and remits collected contribution to the Social Security Administration no later than 15th of every month.

The Director of Public Relations and Communication at RSSB, Moses Kazoora, said they will carry out extensive sensitization to ensure efficient implementation of the scheme.

Dominique Bicamumpaka, the president of one of the country’s largest unions, the National Congress for Labor and Fraternity, said the implementation of the new maternity leave scheme is a demonstration of the solidarity that is characteristic of the Rwandan people.

When a woman gave birth in the past, the community would collect firewood and make fire to keep the ‘maternity ward’ warm for the benefit of the mother and child and would provide her with porridge and food to eat during postnatal period to get enough breast milk.

All that was done in reward for the mother as she had given birth for Rwanda. Indeed, the mother was weak after birth and she needed support.

BY CAROLINE THEURI.

Two ethnic Hamar men from Dimeka in Omo Valley in Ethiopia “dressed flamboyantly” in their ethnic short pants. Read More

Two ethnic Hamar men from Dimeka in Omo Valley in Ethiopia “dressed flamboyantly” in their ethnic short pants. Read More




Two ethnic Hamar men from Dimeka in Omo Valley in Ethiopia "dressed flamboyantly" in their ethnic short pants and with their head decorated standing near their huts and ready to go to the village square to attend a ceremony.

Hamer also well known as the hamar or hammer are one of the most known tribes inSouthwestern Ethiopia. They inhabit the territory east of the Omo River and have villages in Turmi and Dimeka. They are a semi-nomadic, pastoral people, numbering about 42 000.
Honey collection is their major activity and their cattle is the meaning of their life. They will stay for a few months wherever there is enough grass for grazing, putting up their round huts. When the grass is finished, they will move on to new pasture grounds. This is the way they have been living for generations.Once they hunted, but the wild pigs and small antelope have almost disappeared from the lands in which they live; and until 20 years ago, all ploughing was done by hand with digging sticks.
The land isn’t owned by individuals; it’s free for cultivation and grazing, just as fruit and berries are free for whoever collects them. The Hamar move on when the land is exhausted or overwhelmed by weeds.
Often families will pool their livestock and labour to herd their cattle together. In the dry season, whole families go to live in grazing camps with their herds, where they survive on milk and blood from the cattle. Just as for the other tribes in the valley, cattle and goats are at the heart of Hamar life. They provide the cornerstone of a household's livelihood; it’s only with cattle and goats to pay as ‘bride wealth’ that a man can marry. A lot of their culture has now become well-known to the outside world. It's a real privilege to get to know them.

BY: Kweku Darko Ankrah

WONDERFUL AFRICAN EDO CORAL BEADS. Read More

WONDERFUL AFRICAN EDO CORAL BEADS. Read More




WONDERFUL AFRICAN EDO CORAL BEADS: Beautiful Edo (Bini/Benin) bride from Nigeria in beautiful crafted coral beads jewelery paired with perfect okuku crown sitting down during her traditional Edo marriage.
Origin of Edo People/Edo Empire
It is said that the origin of Benin monarch which is in tune with the origin of its people date back to Ogiso Igodo who was reputed to have begun his reign in the year 900 AD. According to R.G Armstrong in his book “The Study of West Africa languages” the glotto-chronological period of separation between Edo, Yoruba and Ibo has been put between 3,000 and 6,000 years. It is no wonder therefore that prof. A.F.C Ryder aptly wrote about the Edo, that “Linguistic evidence suggests that they have occupied this region for some thousands of years”. P .Amway Talbot confirmed that about the seventh millennium BC, the Edo (Benin) and Ewe (popo) and then the Ibo, followed maybe about thee second millennium BC by the earliest Yoruba”. These suggestions give strong indications that Benin Civilization has grow over a period of some 6000 years if not more.

Many writers have put the origin of Edo people as coming from Egypt while other thought they originated from Ife. Eminent writer like Chief (Dr) J.U Egharevba even suggested that the Edo People migrated from Egypt, made a short halt in the Sudan, then at Ife, and finally came to this land where they met an inferior people. The most interesting point about this theory is that no one has paused for a while to ask where the Egyptians migrated from. No one is really certain about the Origin of the Edo people whose origin appears to have lost in myths and legends of the distant past. In the absence of any archeological evidence one is forced to have a second thought on this issue of migration from Egypt and rather let their origin in their present environment prevail.

Benin And Ife (Edo and Yoruba) Controversy on "who is the father of who?"
Some contemporary historians claim that kingship began in Benin in the 13th century with the arrival in Benin of the PRINCE FROM UHE( Ile-Ife or Ife) ORANMIYAN, son of ODUDUWA, who was sent to Benin at the request of the people of Benin, to become King, circa 1200 AD. The respected Benin historian, Jacob U. Egharevba, in his SHORT HISTORY OF BENIN, stated that Benin requested Oduduwa to send a king to rule over them. Some persons who read Egharevba have concluded that there were no kings in Benin until ORANMIYAN arrived. Here too the Edo historians claim those who have jumped to that conclusion have not taken into account, the period of the OGISOS of Benin. Egharevba named 15 Ogisos who ruled over Benin. He referred to the period of the OGISOS as the FIRST DYNASTY of Benin Kingship. Dr. O.S.B. Omeregie, in a paper on THE EVOLUTION OF BENIN which he presented as part of a series of lectures on the LOST TREASURES OF ANCIENT BENIN, organised by Nigeria's NATIONAL COMMISSION FOR MUSEUMS AND MONUMENTS in Benin City on June 25, 1982, named 31 Ogisos of Benin. Both Egharevba and Omoregie however, named OGISO OWODO as the last of them and the father of EKALADERHAN.
However, the view that the first king of Benin came from Ile-Ife, has raised an interesting, albeit controversial question about the BENIN-IFE CONNECTION and the origin of the Benin royal family itself. Since Egharevba, some historians hold the view that the Benin royal family has its origin in Ife and that the OONI OF IFE is the FATHER of the Oba of Benin. Some have even said that the entire people of Benin come from Ife.
There are anthropological and folkloric evidence that prove the existence beyond a doubt. Songs and rituals are still performed today in both Benin and Ife which eulogise it. In Benin, the story is told with nostalgia; in Ife, with euphoria and pride and belief that the Ooni of Ife is the father of the Oba of Benin.
That belief was, no doubt, on the Ooni's mind when he hosted the Oba of Benin who paid him an officail visit on November 11, 1982. The Ooni, speaking with the pride of a father receiving a son who made good abroad, described the oba's visit as a "short home-coming" He said, inter alia: "We welcome Your Royal Highness most heartily back to Ile-Ife, the cradle of our common culture. The origin of your dynasty and ours...... Today is really a very good day for us in Ife and its environs because since you left in 891 AD, we have come to know that your dynasty has perfomed wonderfully well. As we have mentioned briefly during our historic visit to your domain not too long ago, we said that we were there to pat you on the back for a job well done... Your present visit.... we regard as a short home-coming where you will have an opportunity to commune with those deities you left behind.... Now, my son and brother, long may you reign."
That address made a clear, unequivocal allusion to the suggestion that Benin, or at least , the Royal Family, owes its origin to Ife. But in his reply, the Oba of Benin tacitly rejected that submission. In the prelude to his main speech, he said: "IF THE OONI OF IFE CALLS THE OBA OF BENIN HIS SON AND THE OBA OF BENIN CALLS THE OONI HIS SON, THEY ARE BOTH RIGHT."
He did not elaborate But that assertion, innocuous as it might seem, represents the other part of the story which never really been fully told, although told with varying details in Ife and Benin. Despite the varying details, the central theme THAT BENIN DID GO TO IFE TO GET A KING, remains constant. The question then is: WHY DID BENIN CHOOSE IFE INSTEAD OF A NEARER "COUNTRY," TO GO AND LOOK FOR A KING, ESPECIALLY AS IFE ITSELF NEITHER HAD A KING NOR A MONARCHY? The question was answered by the Oba of Benin himself in a lecture he delivered on the EVOLUTION OF TRADITIONAL RULERSHIP IN NIGERIA under the auspices of the Institute of the African Studies of the University of Ibadan on September 11, 1984.
The Oba said, inter alia: "Another important traditional ruler whose origin deserves examination is the Oduduwa of Ife whose origin is also shrouded in myths and legend. He is believed to be the father of the principal rulers of Yorubaland, the father of Oranmiyan who was the the father of EWEKA I of Benin and who was the founder and the first Alafin of Oyo Kingdom; Ife traditional history says Oduduwa descended from heaven ( in a like manner to the Edo account). Some modern historians say that the great Oduduwa was a fugitive from the Moslems of the Middle-east and that he came to settle in what is present -day Ile-Ife. We in Benin believe, and there are historical landmarks for such belief,that the person whom the Yoruba call Oduduwa was the fugitive Prince EKALADERHAN, son of the last OGISO OF BENIN by name OGISO OWODO; he found his way to what is now Ile-Ife after gaining freedom from his executioners and wandering for years through the forests. It was after the demise of his father and when, in the interregnum, Evian, and later his son Ogiamien, tried to assume the kingship, that those who knew that Ekaladerhan was still alive organized a search party to fetch him. It was this search party that emerged at Ile-Ife and discovered Ekaladerhan, known then to the people of Ile-Ife as Oduduwa and already enjoying the status of a King. After failing to persuade him to return with them to Benin, they succeeded in getting him to send his son, ORANMIYAN, to rule Benin...."

BY: Kweku Darko Ankrah

Pastor Sold Anointed Cucumbers To His Church Members During Service. Read More

Pastor Sold Anointed Cucumbers To His Church Members During Service. Read More




According to reports which has been making rounds on social media, a Zimbabwean Prophet, Walter Magaya, allegedly sold anointed cucumbers in his church. His church members, especially the ladies, heavily patronized him. After pictures of the service emerged online, some facebook users criticized the pastor, calling him fake for selling cucumbers in the house of God.

Reports making rounds online, shares how a Zimbabwean Prophet, Walter Magaya, allegedly sold anointed cucumbers in his church and his congregants especially the ladies patronized him well.

The act of course, didn’t go well with some online users who aired their displeasure by putting the man of God on lash.

BEWARE! “Plastic Rice” Is Now Been Sold All Over In Nigerian Market (Watch Video)

BEWARE! “Plastic Rice” Is Now Been Sold All Over In Nigerian Market (Watch Video)




A Nigerian lady who sent the video of how the basmati rice she bought for N5,000 is nothing but ‘plastic’ rice. In a video that will shocked many, she narrated how the rice refused to ‘cook’, see her video below

Potato starch gets mixed with plastic (synthetic resin, for instance) and then formed into rice-shaped kernels. Finally the grains are steamed with a typical rice aroma. Doctors have emphatically warned against consuming the artificial product: three full portions apparently contain as much plastic as there is in a little plastic bag. That's alarming! With these simple tricks you can test whether your rice is wholesome and plastic-free: The Water Test Pour a tablespoon of uncooked rice into a glass with cold water. If the rice all sinks to the bottom of the glass, it's fine. If the grains float up to the surface, be careful! The Fire Test Try setting a little bit of your rice on fire with a match or lighter. If it starts burning right away and smells like burning plastic, then you know what to do! (Do not eat it!) The Mortar And Pestle Test When you crush a few grains of rice with a mortar and pestle they should be reduced to a fine, white, starchy powder. But with artificial rice, you will see a light yellow discoloration instead. The Mold Test If you want to know for sure whether your cooked rice is quite safe, put a small quantity of cooked rice into an airtight container and leave it in a warm place. Within a couple of days it will have gotten moldy. Only fake rice stays mold-free. This is how to be on the safe side. Show these tricks to your rice-eating friends and that way no one will have to eat plastic for dinner! ...

Uniben Medical Student Won A Whopping 19 Awards At Their Just Concluded University Convocation Ceremony. Read More

Uniben Medical Student Won A Whopping 19 Awards At Their Just Concluded University Convocation Ceremony. Read More




The young man is Pius Ehiremen Ojemolon, a medical student who graduated from the University of Benin (UNIBEN) with 19 awards!

smart-kido-3

smart-kido-2

African Nigerian Lady Lists Reasons Why Igbo Men Are The Best Boyfriends/Husbands. Read More

African Nigerian Lady Lists Reasons Why Igbo Men Are The Best Boyfriends/Husbands. Read More




Victoria Onwuchekwa says Igbo men know how to ‘sex a woman’ in the bedroom and spoil her with love and goodies, amongst other reasons.

Read what she wrote below and tell if you agree with her…

Forget we yab Igbo men o.
Igbo men are the best!

Husband material
How to sex a woman in the bedroom
How to spoil a woman with love and goodies
They make the best inlaw to their in-laws

They will not do you surprise package and marry second wife unlike other tribes, no
matter what they will be with you till the end (just don’t cheat sha but some are known to forgive their cheating wives o but that is story for another day).

Our men sef are not enough for Us cause nowadays middlebelt women be dragging them with us……….even calabar women sef( my sister if calabar woman hol your Igbo boyfriend, please just forget it, lick your wounds and move on, calabar woman grip they very strong o)don join dey drag our men with us.

If I come back again to this world, I will still marry an Igbo man.
They are second to none.
The best-est!.

by: Somto Monanu

Afro-Brazilian woman of Ile Aiye, Black consciousness group based in Bahia being dressed in her traditional African Heritage Dress celebrating the 40th anniversary. Read More

Afro-Brazilian woman of Ile Aiye, Black consciousness group based in Bahia being dressed in her traditional African Heritage Dress celebrating the 40th anniversary. Read More




Afro-Brazilian woman of Ile Aiye, Black consciousness group based in Bahia being dressed in her traditional African Heritage Dress celebrating the 40th anniversary of Ile Aiye at Salvador, Bahia in Brazil. Ile Aiye women are chosen to represent the power of black culture to the world, in this, the city (Salvador, Bahia) nicknamed “Black Rome” and arguably the center of black culture in Brazil. Salvador, Bahia is considered the blackest city in the country with a population of more than 2 million, 80% of whom are recognized as Afro-Brazilian. Salvador is located in the northeastern state of Bahia, a state that is world renown for its strong links to Mother Africa. The population of Bahia is said to be between 70-75% Afro-Brazilian and the city of Salvador was a major port of entry of African slaves during the Trans-Atlantic slave trade.

Influenced by the American Black Power movement the early 70s, the lyrics in the music of Ilê Aiyê were a voice of protest against the farce of the Brazilian “Racial Democracy” with a visual aesthetic that emphasized African history and culture. The founders of the popular bloco afro originally wanted to call the Carnaval/Social/Percussion organization “Poder Negro (Black Power)” when it was founded in 1974 but were advised by authorities that this wouldn’t be a good idea. Ilê Aiyê’s ultimate mission was raising black consciousness amongst Brazil’s African descendants, a population that had been indoctrinated to prefer a European aesthetic and to have shame in its African ancestry and appearance. Ilê Aiyê was a bloco that only accepted black members, a controversial practice in a land where millions of people believed that racism was only a thing of the United States or South Africa and that the races of Brazil lived a harmonious co-existence. The group instituted a Rastafarian cultural philosophy and became active in the community with its social work. Although visible throughout the year, spectators recognize the appearance of the group during the Carnaval season by its colorful outfits: red, representing the bloodshed in the slavery era, yellow, representing power, white, for peace, and black, the color of their skin.
For 40 years now Ilê Aiyê has crowned a woman to represent the “most beautiful of the beautiful”. The woman selected to be the “Ebony Goddess” is chosen as a symbol of black beauty in a country where the skin color of fashion runways, magazine stands and television stations are overwhelmingly white, a contradiction in a supposed “racial democracy” where the majority of 200 million citizens declared themselves non-white in the latest national census. Beyond beauty, the winner of the Night of the Black Beauty must also possess a knowledge of the history of the group as well charisma and an elevated sense of black consciousness.

BY: Kweku Darko Ankrah

Afro-Brazilian women of Ile Aiye, Black consciousness group based. Read More

Afro-Brazilian women of Ile Aiye, Black consciousness group based. Read More




Afro-Brazilian women of Ile Aiye, Black consciousness group based in Bahia dressed in their traditional African Heritage Dress celebrating the 40th anniversary of Ile Aiye at Salvador, Bahia in Brazil. Ile Aiye women are chosen to represent the power of black culture to the world, in this, the city (Salvador, Bahia) nicknamed “Black Rome” and arguably the center of black culture in Brazil. Salvador, Bahia is considered the blackest city in the country with a population of more than 2 million, 80% of whom are recognized as Afro-Brazilian. Salvador is located in the northeastern state of Bahia, a state that is world renown for its strong links to Mother Africa. The population of Bahia is said to be between 70-75% Afro-Brazilian and the city of Salvador was a major port of entry of African slaves during the Trans-Atlantic slave trade.

Influenced by the American Black Power movement the early 70s, the lyrics in the music of Ilê Aiyê were a voice of protest against the farce of the Brazilian “Racial Democracy” with a visual aesthetic that emphasized African history and culture. The founders of the popular bloco afro originally wanted to call the Carnaval/Social/Percussion organization “Poder Negro (Black Power)” when it was founded in 1974 but were advised by authorities that this wouldn’t be a good idea. Ilê Aiyê’s ultimate mission was raising black consciousness amongst Brazil’s African descendants, a population that had been indoctrinated to prefer a European aesthetic and to have shame in its African ancestry and appearance. Ilê Aiyê was a bloco that only accepted black members, a controversial practice in a land where millions of people believed that racism was only a thing of the United States or South Africa and that the races of Brazil lived a harmonious co-existence. The group instituted a Rastafarian cultural philosophy and became active in the community with its social work. Although visible throughout the year, spectators recognize the appearance of the group during the Carnaval season by its colorful outfits: red, representing the bloodshed in the slavery era, yellow, representing power, white, for peace, and black, the color of their skin.
For 40 years now Ilê Aiyê has crowned a woman to represent the “most beautiful of the beautiful”. The woman selected to be the “Ebony Goddess” is chosen as a symbol of black beauty in a country where the skin color of fashion runways, magazine stands and television stations are overwhelmingly white, a contradiction in a supposed “racial democracy” where the majority of 200 million citizens declared themselves non-white in the latest national census. Beyond beauty, the winner of the Night of the Black Beauty must also possess a knowledge of the history of the group as well charisma and an elevated sense of black consciousness.

BY: Kweku Darko Ankrah

Zimbabwe’s First Lady Declares Herself As New President After Her Husband Robert Mugabe’s Retirement. Read More

Zimbabwe’s First Lady Declares Herself As New President After Her Husband Robert Mugabe’s Retirement. Read More





Zimbabwean first lady, Grace Mugabe has announced herself as the new president to take over when her husband, Robert Mugabe finally steps down due to his concerned health issues.
Robert Mugabe, is the world’s oldest and one of the longest serving Head of State at 92 years old. Mugabe having ruled for over 30 years, was reportedly advised to drop out of the 2018 election race by his medical doctors, which possibly is the main reason he is forcing himself into retirement.

 

Speaking at a gathering over the weekend, Mashonaland West women’s league chairperson, Angeline Muchemeyi revealed that Grace Mugabe who has been the league secretary since 2014, told them that there is no point for her fighting for a lesser position after several plans and arrangements had been made with the ailing president to hand over the role of the state affairs to her.

The First Lady said:

‘I’m the wife of the president, I’m the president already … I plan and do everything with the president, what more do I want, for now the position of the women boss is enough.’

Source: BuzzSouthAfrica