Ghanaian Cultural Troupe in their Kente cloth dancing traditional Akan “Kete” dance to the rhythms. See More

Ghanaian Cultural Troupe in their Kente cloth dancing traditional Akan “Kete” dance to the rhythms. See More




Ghanaian Cultural Troupe in their Kente cloth dancing traditional Akan "Kete" dance to the rhythms of the big Fontomfrom drums at Accra, Ghana. Kete is an Akan drum ensemble, the origin of which is unknown. Many kete ensembles exist in the Akan regions of Ghana and play at funerals. The Asantehene’s ensemble plays at ancestor venerations and formerly played at executions. They were also taken to war. It is said indicates that earlier Asantehenes had them played in the royal mausoleum while they inspected the royal skeletons.

The music of kete is reputed to possess the power of attracting good spirits. J.H.
Kwabena Nketia states that the surrogated texts extol high moral values through the
telling of heroic ideals. A kete dance developed that involves symbolic hand gestures reflecting these values. It is danced barefoot and trained male dancers dance with their lapa cloth lowered beneath the chest.
The instruments of kete includes the petia (small stick drum), kwadum (master drum), apentema (hand drum), and abrukua (stick drum). The donno (hour-glass-shaped talking drum) is absent from this group, and the ntorowa (gourd rattle) and dawuro (boat-shaped, hand-held iron bell) are in the back row. Kete ensembles once contained a vocal choir and choir of atenteben (vertical bamboo flutes), but both are no longer utilized.

BY: Kweku Darko Ankrah

Teenage girls have built Africa’s first-ever private satellite. Read More

Teenage girls have built Africa’s first-ever private satellite. Read More




In May next year, Africa will launch its first-ever private satellite into space, to monitor the continent's shifting weather conditions.

Unlike most private satellites out there, this one has mostly been built by 14 South African teenage girls, as part of a high school science, technology, engineering, and maths (STEM) boot camp.

The students have designed and made the payload for the satellite, which will orbit over Earth's poles and scan the surface of the African continent.

The satellite's payload will send back detailed thermal imaging data twice a day to help disaster prevention and improve food security in the region.

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"We can try to determine and predict the problems Africa will be facing in the future," Brittany Bull, a student at Pelican Park High School in South Africa who worked on the payload, told CNN.

"Where our food is growing, where we can plant more trees and vegetation and also how we can monitor remote areas ... We have a lot of forest fires and floods but we don't always get out there in time."

The satellite itself was bought by South Africa's Meta Economic Development Organisation (MEDO), and the students are being trained to make its payload by satellite engineers from Cape Peninsula University of Technology.

In their initial training, the girls programmed and launched small CricketSat satellites using high-altitude weather balloons.

But they've since moved on to programming the satellite payloads, which will be able to collect thermal imaging data and show where drought and floods are expected.

That's important, because an El Niño induced drought in April this year led to southern Africa producing 9.3 million tons [8.4 million tonnes] less corn than usual - as a result, South Africa will have to import more maize to make up for the shortfall.

"In South Africa we have experienced some of the worst floods and droughts and it has really affected the farmers very badly," one of the team, Sesam Mngqengqiswa from Philippi High School, told CNN.

"We expect to receive a good signal, which will allow us to receive reliable data ... It's a new field for us [in Africa] but I think with it we would be able to make positive changes to our economy."

Mngqengqiswa is pictured below (centre) with Ayesha Salie (left) and Bhanekazi Tandwa (right).

If all goes according to plan, the satellite is scheduled to launch in May 2017, which will make it the first satellite to be launched into orbit by an African private company.

The group also wants to expand to involve girls from Namibia, Malawi, Kenya, and Rwanda as a way of inspiring young African women to work on STEM fields.

Many of the girls involved have bigger plans though, such as making it into space themselves - something no black African has ever done before.

"Discovering space and seeing Earth's atmosphere, it's not something many black Africans have been able to do, or do not get the opportunity to look at," Mngqengqiswa told CNN. "I want to be able to experience these things."

"I want to show to fellow girls that we don't need to sit around or limit ourselves," added Bull. "Any career is possible - even aerospace."

BY: FIONA MACDONALD

You can see the girls working on the satellite payload below:

Ethnic Tikar man from Cameroon with his family in their traditional Cameroonian national dress. Read More

Ethnic Tikar man from Cameroon with his family in their traditional Cameroonian national dress. Read More




Ethnic Tikar man from Cameroon with his family in their traditional Cameroonian national dress after a Cameroon national Independence Day celebration in USA. Some high profile African Americans trace their ancestry to Tikar ethnic group. On the 2006 PBS television program African American Lives, the noted African American musician Quincy Jones had his DNA tested; the test showed him to be of Tikar descent. In the PBS television program Finding Your Roots, African American former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice learned she shared maternal heritage with the Tikar. Actress Alfre Woodard's also traced her recent DNA ancestry to the Tikar people of Cameroon

TIKAR PEOPLE: CAMEROON`S ARTISTIC BAMENDA GRASSFIELD TRIBE
The Tikar are a group of related ethnic proto-Bantoid Tikar-speaking groups in Cameroon. They live primarily in the northwestern part of the country, in the Northwest Province near the Nigerian border. In the Bamenda Grassfields, those who claim Tikar origin include Nso, Kom, Bum,Bafut, Oku, Mbiame, Wiya, Tang, War, Mbot, Mbem, Fungom, Weh, Mmen, Bamunka, Babungo, Bamessi, Bamessing, Bambalang, Bamali, Bafanji, Baba (Papiakum), Bangola, Big Babanki, Babanki Tungo, Nkwen, Bambili and Bambui.
Their population is approximately 47,000. They share their language with the Bedzan pygmies.
In recent times, the Tikar people have become popular to African-Americans.

Language
The Tikar people speak Bantoid language, also called Tikar. Tikar is a Bantoid language of uncertain classification spoken in Cameroon by the Bankim, Ngambe, and related Tikar peoples, as well as by the Bedzan Pygmies. Blench (2011) states that the little evidence available suggests that it is most closely related to the Mambiloid and Dakoid languages.Variants of the name are Tikali, Tikar-East, Tikari, Tingkala. A Bandobo variety (Ndobo, Ndob, Ndome) may be a separate language. Less divergent dialects are Twumwu (Tumu) in Bankim, Tige in Ngambe, Nditam, Kong, Mankim, Gambai, and Bedzan.

Tikar is a cover term for three relatively similar dialects spoken in the Cameroun Grassfields, Tikari, Tige and Tumu (Stanley 1991). Tikar is spoken on the Tikar plain, south and south-east of Mambiloid proper, and it shares a common border with some Mambila and Kwanja lects in Cameroun. The Tikar Plain, a highly multi-lingual region, is referenced in many early administrative documents. Koelle (1954) includes a Tikar wordlist, but the first analysis of the Tikar language may be in Westermann & Bryan (1952) who considered it an isolated language. Richardson (1957) groups it with Bantoid and Williamson (1971) treats it as an isolated subgroup of her Bantu node. Clearly, the Tikar language has always been somewhat problematic in terms of it classification. Dieu & Renaud (1983) placed it together with Ndemli, another language that is hard to classify, although this may be simply an admission of ignorance. Piron (1996,
III:628) recognises it as part of her non-Bantu group and assigns it a co-ordinate branch with Dakoid, Tivoid, Grassfields and the other branches of Bantoid (her ‘South Bantoid’) in opposition to Mambiloid. Stanley (1991) notes that Tikar has many lexical similarities with the neighbouring Bafia (A53) but that the morphosyntax is quite different.

History/Origin
According to historians, anthropologists, archeologists and oral tradition, the Tikar originated from north-eastern Cameroon, around the Adamawa and Lake Chad regions(present-day Adamawa, North and Far-North Provinces). Tikar migration southwards and westwards probably intensified with the raid for slaves by invading Fulani from Northern Nigeria in the 18th and 19th centuries. However, there is reason to believe that such migration was ongoing for centuries long before the invasion. The pressure of invasion by the Fulani raiders certainly occasioned the movements that led the Tikar to their current locations in the Western Grassfields (Bamenda Plateau) and Eastern Grassfields (Fumban) and the Tikar plain of Bankim (Upper Mbam) (Mbuagbaw, Brain & Palmer, 1987:26; Mbaku 2005:10-12). Upon arrival in the Grassfields, the Tikar found other populations in place, populations which had either migrated from elsewhere or had inhabited the region for centuries. Their arrival occasioned population movements, just as did the arrival of others after them. Pre-colonial Cameroon, like the rest of Africa, was richly characterized by population movements not always induced by conflict or invasion.
In the Bamenda Grassfields, those who claim Tikar origin include Nso, Kom, Bum,Bafut, Oku, Mbiame, Wiya, Tang, War, Mbot, Mbem, Fungom, Weh, Mmen, Bamunka, Babungo, Bamessi, Bamessing, Bambalang, Bamali, Bafanji, Baba (Papiakum), Bangola, Big Babanki, Babanki Tungo, Nkwen, Bambili and Bambui. Their alleged migration from the Upper Mbam River region was in waves, and mostly led by princes of Rifum fons, desirous of setting up their own dynasties (Nkwi & Warnier 1982:16; Nkwi1987:15-28). The authors of A History of Cameroon capture the Tikar migration asfollows:
“It was about three hundred years ago that increasing pressure from the north and internal troubles plus the desire for new lands led to the splitting up of Tikar groups into small bands, which, having left Kimi, drifted further west and southwest. Some of these moved under the leadership of the sons of a Tikar ruler who
later called themselves Fons, the most common Bamenda term for paramount chiefs. These groups, at various times reached what is now Mezam. Among the earlier were those who came from Ndobo to the Ndop plain in the south of Bamenda, where they formed small, politically independent villages a few kilometers apart. No semblance of political unity was achieved. In the north-east we have Mbaw, Mbem, and Nsungli, also settlements of Tikar, and below the escarpment of a later date settlements of Wiya, Tang, and War. The main body of this group however, set off under the leadership of their Fon and founded the kingdom of Bum. The Bafut, Kom, and Nsaw were among the last to arrive.” (Mbuagbaw et al. 1987:30).

BY: Kweku Darko Ankrah

Hundreds Arrested in Protests Over the Use of French in Cameroon’s Schools. Read More

Hundreds Arrested in Protests Over the Use of French in Cameroon’s Schools. Read More




Authorities have arrested at least 100 people in connection with protests over the use of French in schools and courthouses in the English-speaking regions of Cameroon. The BBC reports that there was tension in Cameroon’s northwestern city of Bamenda on Tuesday after at least one person was killed and many others were injured. Businesses and schools were forced to close as thousands of demonstrators took to the streets to protest what they claim is discrimination against English-speaking minorities in the country’s north western and south western regions.

today

English speakers argue that in addition to being excluded from top civil service jobs, official government documents are often written in French with no English translations, even though both are recognized as the country’s official languages.

Cameroon was first colonized by the Germans, but by the end of World War I the area was divided between Britain and France. In 1961,the British-run region in present-day southern Cameroon joined the larger French-speaking parts, forming the Republic of Cameroon.

In the past, teachers in English-speaking regions have spoken out against the employment of French-speaking teachers in primary and secondary schools. Lawyers in the region also say they are opposed to working with court employees who are not familiar with the application of British common law.

According to Reuters, protesters were also demanding independence for the northwest and southwest region, where English is predominantly spoken. There are eight other semi-autonomous regions in the predominantly French-speaking country.

Cameroon’s Communications Minister, Issa Tchiroma Bakary, insisted that the protests are not a reflection of the public disaffection over President Paul Biya’s 34-year rule.

Bakary said the protests were hijacked by “hooligans” and “misfits” who took the opportunity to attack shops and destroy properties in the town of Bamenda. He also suggested that members of the opposition took the opportunity to incite people against the government.

“There are some politicians who are using the situation as a tool for leverage to pursue their own interests.”

BY MARK BABATUNDE

Kenyans Thrilled by so called ‘Jesus’ Walking Barefoot in Nairobi. Read More

Kenyans Thrilled by so called ‘Jesus’ Walking Barefoot in Nairobi. Read More




A White man supposedly resembling Jesus of Nazareth as portrayed in many gospel movies was seen walking barefoot on the streets of Nairobi, Kenya’s capital, Wednesday almost causing a stampede as Kenyans struggled to see and take selfies with him.

The man, who is yet to be identified, has a long beard and face, wore a tattered robe, and held a walking stick, depicting the same image of Jesus Christ in most Western movies.

The rather startling images of him walking on the muddy streets of Nairobi with heavy luggage on his back have been making rounds on social media, with many Kenyans making hilarious remarks about them:

white-man-walks-barefoot-in-nairobi

Others wanted to see the 12 disciples of Jesus and the two thieves who were crucified with him as written in the Bible.

Perhaps in an attempt to convince themselves that the man was indeed Jesus Christ, some people claimed that they heard the trumpets that were promised in the Holy book when the son of God comes back to earth.

Others claimed the list of sinners destined for hell would be coming out on Sunday, with others calling on their friends and relatives to repent their sins:

BY FREDRICK NGUGI.

The Natural Hair Movement is Empowering Women in Nigeria. Read More

The Natural Hair Movement is Empowering Women in Nigeria. Read More




As the natural hair movement sweeps across the United States and Europe, it’s also making its way to various corners of the motherland. The movement encourages African women, and others with kinky, curly, and otherwise not straight hair, to embrace their hair in its natural state.

Many women think that they can’t handle their hair without slathering it with a chemical relaxer. Over time, these relaxers can cause hair to become weak and brittle.

The natural hair movement reminds African women that they are beautiful just the way they are, and with the proper care methods their hair can be beautiful and manageable without chemical relaxers.

Among other African cosmopolitans, the natural hair movement has made its way to Lagos, Nigeria, which recently held its 3rd installment of the Natural Hair and Beauty Show.

The event, hosted by the Kinky Apothecary, one of Nigeria’s first natural hair brands, featured speakers from various countries, free hair and product consultation services, and a VIP lounge with Henna, nail painting, hair demos, and Absolut cocktails.

The event was not only a celebration of the natural beauty of African women and their hair, but also an opportunity for seasoned, budding, and potential naturals to network, ask questions, and share their tips and tricks.

omolayonkem_nnhb-56

The speakers included natural hair bloggers from all over the world speaking about their truths and sharing their experiences.

Los Angeles native Felicia Leatherwood ran a workshop titled, “Loving Your Hair”, while Kiitan A talked to the audience about protective styles and crochet braiding. Ijeoma Eboh, a Nigerian-American blogger, discussed the do’s and don’ts of dying natural hair, something she has been doing ever since she went natural. Wunmi Akiniagun held a natural hair styling workshop and Ronke Raji spoke about managing unrealistic hair expectations.

Nigerian blogger Chinwe Nnajifor gave product consultations while reminding people that there’s not a “one cure for all” product that solves all hair problems.

Most of the speakers didn’t just talk about hair, some took a holistic approach by urging people to live their best life in all by embracing their natural beauty.

Gaelle Prudencio, a Senegalese blogger living in France, talked about her journey to loving her body and herself. She reminded the audience that body positivity is about loving your body enough to take care of it and also not bringing others down by judging their bodies.

Yagazie Emezi, a multi-disciplinary artist and documentary photographer shared her photographs and spoke on challenging beauty standards through photography. Efik Zara held an interactive session with the audience, which pushed them to define their brand and be the best versions of themselves.

omolayonkem_nnhb-165

Other bloggers and participants agreed that Nigerians still have a ways to go before the majority of women fully embrace natural hair. People who are easily offended by the shocked glances and rude questions about their hair may take longer to come around.

Some people shared that they were worried that they wouldn’t be able to care for their or that their hair was “too hard.”

Chinwe Nnajifor, also known as Igbocurls, revealed that she received similar reactions to her hair whether she was in a diverse and large cosmopolitan like Lagos or in a smaller inland city like Kaduna.

“We have to try to eradicate the ignorance,” she said.

Both Nnajifor and Lawson noted that many people rocking natural hair in the country had lived or schooled abroad, but that there was a growing number of Nigerian locals warming to the movement.

Although still young, the Nigerian natural hair community can only grow bigger and stronger, particularly by leveraging events like the Natural Hair and Beauty Show to bring like-minded individuals together to learn about how to take care and appreciate natural hair.

BY OMOLAYO OJO

Top 7 African Tribes Where Women Literally Rule. Read More

Top 7 African Tribes Where Women Literally Rule. Read More




serer-people-recording-africa

Serer

The Serer tribe is a West African ethno-religious group that makes up the third largest tribe in Senegal. This group represents 15 percent of the Senegalese population. The Serer people are also present in Gambia and southern Mauritania. The group originated from the Senegal River Valley and moved south between the 11th and 12th centuries. They are historically known as the matrilineal ethnic group that long resisted the expansion of Islam.

owambo-people-african

Ovambo

Also referred to as Aawambo, the Ovambo people are a tribal ethnic group predominantly found in southern Africa. They are the largest tribe in Namibia, accounting for 50 percent of the country’s population. The group mostly occupies Namibia’s northern region. The Ovambo people are also found in southern Angola, where the name Ambo is very common. They are said to have moved south from the upper regions of Zambezi around the 14th century. Most of them practice Christianity and speak the Ovambo language.

nubians-pinterest-1

Nubians

Named after Nuba, a region along the Nile River, Nubians are said to have originated from the Noba people who were nomads occupying present-day northern Sudan and southern Egypt. The region was home to one of the earliest civilizations of ancient northeastern Africa, with a history that can be traced back to 2,000 B.C. During the post-classical era, Nubians were divided into various kingdoms, which resulted in the “Arab-anization” of much of its population.

ngazidja-people-nairaland

Ngazidja/Grande Comore

Ngazidja is a tribal group of people predominantly found in Comoros. They are estimated to be about 393,000, according to People Groups. These people are part of the Swahili-speaking Bantus, occupying the sub-Saharan African kinship bloc. Their primary language is Ngazidja Comorian, and they are predominantly practicing Muslims.

kung-san-people

!Kung San

Also spelled as !Xun, the !Kung San is an ethnic group predominantly found in the Kalahari Desert in Namibia, Botswana, and Angola. They are well-known for their extensive use of click consonants. Letter “!K” in the name “!Kung” is a click sound similar to how a cork sounds when pulled from a bottle. !Kung San originally lived in semi-permanent camps of about 10 to 30 people who were mainly hunters and gatherersr. They are also animistic and animalistic, which means they believe in personification and impersonal forces. !Kung San people speak the !Kung
language, commonly referred to as Ju.

imazighen-people

Imazighen

Also known as the “Berbers,” the Amazighen people are an ethnic group occupying north Africa. They are settled in an area stretching from the Atlantic Ocean to the Siwa Oasis in Egypt, and from the Mediterranean Sea to the Niger River. Originally, the Amazinghen people spoke Berber languages, which together formed the Berber branch of the Afro-Asiatic lanuage family, but colonization introduced new languages like French and Spanish. This group of people is predominantly Muslim.

kom-people-the-hindu

KOM

The Kom people are the largest ethnic group in the northwestern region of Cameroon. They originated from upper Mbam in Tikari and later settled in Liakom. Their elaborate language and rich culture are similar to their closest neighbors, the “Tikar.” The Kom people mainly speak the Kom language, also known as Itangikom and are largely Christians.

BY FREDRICK NGUGI

We as a people of Africa and it’s descendants worldwide, can not continue being told who is righteous and who is evil dictator and we just taking it. Read More

We as a people of Africa and it’s descendants worldwide, can not continue being told who is righteous and who is evil dictator and we just taking it. Read More




We as a people of Africa and it's descendants worldwide, can not continue being told who is righteous and who is evil dictator and we just taking it with a glass of water like a subscription drug for pains induced by colonial brainwashing. We must now choose who we glorify and who we don't. These men never went around the globe killing people and stealing lands and resources, the people who hate them are beneficiaries and benefactors of land invasions, plundering, mass genocides and slavery. You decide who is more evil? People fighting to save their only ancestral lands, or those trying to steal it and when they fail, brand these people evil dictators.

 

Thomas Sankara! The upright man.

15268049_1111446755639235_7197206718300804160_n

 

Ghaddafi.

15284036_1111447018972542_327995082689170867_n

 

Idi Amin.

15203254_1111447278972516_7063650959459108204_n

 

Fidel Castro

15181677_1111446958972548_1894375976757749917_n

 

El commandate.  Hugo Chavez!

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Kwame Nkrumah.

15235913_1111447042305873_1857400634560402881_o

 

Steven bantu biko!

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Papa Lumumba.

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Robert Mugabe

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BY:Africlandpost

Nigerian Lady Njideka Akunyili Just Set A New Auction Record After One Of Her Artworks Sold For A Whopping $1.1Million. Read More

Nigerian Lady Njideka Akunyili Just Set A New Auction Record After One Of Her Artworks Sold For A Whopping $1.1Million. Read More

Late Dora Akunyili’s daughter, artist Njideka Akunyili Crosby, set a new record in New York last week when her work “Drown” soared to sell for $1,092,500.

 

nigerian-lady-njideka-akunyili-2

 

The amount was over three times the high-estimate ($200,000-$300,000), in Sotheby’s Contemporary Art Evening Sale.
According to reportsafrique, no fewer than 11 bidders competed for the work that was eventually sold to an anonymous buyer on the telephone.

nigerian-lady-njideka-akunyili

This was the second time in less than two months that the auction record for Njideka Akunyili Crosby had been broken at Sotheby’s. The previous auction record for the artist was $93,750, set by her

“Untitled” work from 2011 at Sotheby’s New York in September 2016.
“Drown” is said to be an intimate self-portrait of the artist with her husband, Justin.

Ugandan Schools Funded by Zuckerberg, Gates Accused of Teaching Porn. Read More

Ugandan Schools Funded by Zuckerberg, Gates Accused of Teaching Porn. Read More




Bridge International Academies, a group of low-cost private schools in Uganda supported by American billionaires Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook and Bill Gates of Microsoft, have been criticized for teaching “pornography,” according to Quartz. On November 4th, the High Court in Uganda ordered the closure of more than 60 schools belonging to Bridge International Academies, citing poor sanitary conditions and substandard education.
“We could not allow teaching sexual matters in public. Why teach pornography in Bridge schools? This moral decay couldn’t be tolerated,” Uganda’s Minister of Finance, Planning, and Economic Development, Matia Kasaija, said during the convocation ceremony of Uganda’s Martyrs University.

Gospel of Homosexuality

Kasaija further accused Bridge of using its schools to promote sexual education, adding that the program was being used to spread the “gospel” of homosexuality to Ugandan children.

However, the school has categorically denied any presence of such a program in its curriculum and maintains that it does not teach any foreign material that is against Ugandan cultural values.

The spokesman of Bridge International Academies, Solomon Sserwanja, described the minister’s allegations as unfortunate and asked him to “come out with proof over the matter in question.”

Sserwanja also promised to use the necessary legal channels to force the minister to substantiate his allegations.

Education Situation in Uganda

While Uganda has made significant progress in making education accessible to the majority of citizens, challenges still exist as a significant number of children don’t receive the most basic form of education.

While primary school enrollments in Uganda appear to have improved over the years, studies show great inequalities in education nationally, according to a report published by Twaweza.

About 61 percent of children in Kotido, which is in the northern party of the country, have never been enrolled in school.

The report also identified a slow rate of progression by students in primary school, with many children being more than two years older than other classmates in their grade. About 31 percent of 8-year-old students are too old for their grade.

The situation is even worse in older students, with about 82 percent of students aged 13 or older being two or more years too old for their grade.

BY FREDRICK NGUGI.