Hausa boy IN HIST TRADITIONAL HAUSA WEAR AT…Read More

Hausa boy IN HIST TRADITIONAL HAUSA WEAR AT…Read More




Hausa boy IN HIST TRADITIONAL HAUSA WEAR at an Islamic festival durbar,Kano,Nigeria.

HAUSA PEOPLE: AFRICA`S LARGEST SCATTERED WARRIOR TRIBE AND TRADERS WHO RESPECT THEIR CULTURE

The Hausa (also known as Hausawa, Haoussa, Ausa, Habe, Mgbakpa) are one of the largest ethnic groups in West Africa and the largest ethnic group in Africa. They are a chiefly located in the Sahelian areas of northern Nigeria and southeastern Niger, with significant numbers also living in parts of Cameroon, Ghana, Côte d'Ivoire, Chad and Sudan. Predominantly Hausa communities are scattered throughout West Africa and on the traditional Hajj route across the Sahara Desert, especially around the town of Agadez.




A few Hausa have also moved to large coastal cities in the region such as Lagos, Accra, Kumasi and Cotonou, as well as to parts of North Africa like Libya. Most Hausa, however, are concentrated in small villages or towns in West Africa, where they grow crops or raise livestock, including cattle. They speak the Hausa language, an Afro-Asiatic language of the Chadic group.
The Hausa are a racially diverse but culturally homogeneous people who originally came from northern Nigeria and south-central Niger. Hausas have long been famous for wide-ranging itinerant trading, and wealthy merchants share the highest social positions with the politically powerful and the learned.
The Hausa population is over 30,000,000; their primary religion is Islam and considered to be the 4th largest Muslim bloc in the world with about 36,000 known Christians and a sizable number also follow African Traditional Religion.

BY: Kweku Darko Ankrah

THE SAMBURU PEOPLE KENYA`S TRADITIONALLY FLAMBOYANT “BUTTERFLY DANCING ETHNIC GROUP” See More

THE SAMBURU PEOPLE KENYA`S TRADITIONALLY FLAMBOYANT “BUTTERFLY DANCING ETHNIC GROUP” See More




The Samburu people are not so distant relatives to the Maasai although they live just above the equator where the foothills of Mount Kenya merge into the northern desert and slightly south of Lake Turkana in the Rift Valley Province of Kenya in East Africa.

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This is a warrior-race of cattle-owning pastoralists. The Samburu, proud of their culture and traditions, still cherish and retain the customs and ceremonies of their ancestors, unlike many other tribes in Kenya who have been more influenced by Western civilization.



In front of the backdrop of the often barren and dusty horizon, the Samburu people bring life and colour to the landscape either out on the plains swathed in their brilliant red cloth or, even more dazzlingly, in their village with their songs and dances. Typically and traditionally, they use no instruments, even drums. They have dances for various occasions of life. But no matter what the occasion, the men primarily dance by jumping, and high vertical jumping from a standing position is like a competitive sport. Most dances involve the men and women dancing in separate circles with specific moves for each sex, while still coordinating the movements of the two groups. The central musical theme of the Samburu dances is a deep reverberating male vocal sound, a rhythmic chanting hauntingly similar to the territorial call of a lion. Warriors move with a series of astonishing vertical leaps, fiercely encouraged by the cries and shouts of other observing warriors while the women bounce, flip and swirl their magnificent collars of beads.

BY: Kweku Darko Ankrah

Jarawa sub-ethnic Andamanese people in India

Jarawa sub-ethnic Andamanese people in India




Jarawa sub-ethnic Andamanese people in India (who are the original inhabitant of India before the Mangolian came to settle in Asia) performing their traditional African dance. These are the original bonafide owners of India as a country but the Indian govt has done all it could to prevent the world from knowing about them.




ANDAMANESE TRIBE: ONE OF THE EARLIEST AFRICAN NATIVES OF ASIA AND THE ORIGINAL INHABITANTS OF INDIA
The Andamanese tribe may today be seen as facing extinction and still consigned to the hinterlands of India where they suffer massive humiliation as a group of black Africans, but they are one of the original Africans (blacks) who inhabited Asia and the country India before the arrival of the Mangolians or so-called Asians. Out of India`s over 1 billion population, Andamanese population is now below 350. This special group of ancient African Indians and bona fide owners of India as a country will gradually fade out of the world if proper international humanitarian attention is not given to them.
THE JARAWA: The Jarawas are said to be the darkest people (sociologically and scientifically speaking and not from a derogatory point of view) in the world.Their population size is now estimated 250 to 400.Jarawa (also sometimes spelt Jarwa, which is closer to the original pronunciation) means "stranger" in the language of the Great Andamanese Aka-Bea . The Jarawa call themselves Ya-eng-nga (which, invevitably, means "human being". Without the characteristic Jarawa prefix ya- this is very close to what the Onge call themselves: en-nge, and which in Onge also has the same meaning as in Jarawa, a major piece of evidence for the long-suspected relationship between the two groups.
The Jarawa are the quintessentially "hostile Andamanese". They seem to have been at war with the Great Andamanese in general and with their main enemy, the Great Andamanese Aka-Bea tribes, for a very long time.
When the British landing party established itself at Port Blair in order to set up a penal colony in 1858 it knew nothing of the Jarawa. They soon heard about them, from their their new Great Andamanese Aka-Bea allies that there was a ferocious tribe hiding in the interior of South Great Andaman. The British paid little attention, being wholly preoccupied with the difficult task of establishing their new penal colony in a climate that seemed to them more hostile than any new tribe could be.

BY: Kweku Darko Ankrah

BASOTHO PEOPLE BANTU PEOPLE WITH UNIQUE CULTURAL HERITAGE See More

BASOTHO PEOPLE BANTU PEOPLE WITH UNIQUE CULTURAL HERITAGE See More




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The Basotho people also known as Sotho, are Bantu people of the Kingdom of Lesotho (lusō'tō), an enclave within the Republic of South Africa. Maseru is the capital and largest city. There are ten administrative districts. Lesotho is often referred to as "the roof of Africa," its a beautiful country.

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The Basotho nation emerged from the accomplished diplomacy of Moshoeshoe 1st, who gathered together disparate clans of Sotho-Tswana origin whom had dispersed across southern Africa in the early nineteenth century. Even so, the majority of Sotho people today live in South Africa, as they have done for centuries.



basotho-girls-initiates-2

 

Mythological/folkloric origins
Ntsoana-Tsatsi  is believed to be the place of origin of the Sotho/Basotho people. It is both a mythical and
physical place. The mythical aspect of it, as described by Ellenberger (1988) is a place from where the first Sotho people emerged.

They are believed to have come from the ground at Ntsoana-Tsatsi, where there is a lot of water and reeds. The geographical location of this place is believed to be Vrede in the Free State Province of South Africa, according to accounts by informants. It still carries this name and some Sotho people are still found in the area.

 

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History
Pastoralist Bantu speaking people settled in South Africa in about 200–500 CE. Originating in the vicinity of West and Central Africa, waves of Iron Age immigrants spread across the broad Southern African peninsula, easily displacing the aboriginal Stone Age inhabitants of South Africa. By the 19th century, stable patterns of settlement had emerged. Nguni speaking tribes (primarily Zulu and Xhosa) occupied the east and southern coastal regions, while a series of Sotho kingdoms covered the southern portion of the plateau (Free

BY: Kweku Darko Ankrah

Scream Rooms A New Way To Cope with Stress in Egypt

Scream Rooms A New Way To Cope with Stress in Egypt




In Egyptian entrepreneur and bookstore owner is diversifying his business portfolio by providing people with a space to scream and yell as a way to let out their pent up frustration. Heidi Radwan runs a bookstore in Cairo, known as the Bab Aldonia. The bookstore opened a few years ago and boasts an impressive collection of books, a mini café, a music classroom, and a room for screaming. According to CNN, Cairo’s residents are flocking to the Scream Room to yell away their stress.
Ironically, the room is situated next to the shelves where children’s books are stacked. It is a dark small room with soundproof walls and once inside, visitors are allowed to scream their lungs out in 10-minute intervals. The room also features a drum that users can bang on for added stress relief.



Many consider screaming or yelling as a cheap and effective way to release repressed or pent up negative emotions, such as anger, fear, frustration, and disappointment. Supporters of screaming therapy describe it as a vocal punching bag.

“It’s good for everyday stress. People go there and scream to let go of their daily problems,” Radwan explained.
Radwan she got the idea for the room from one of her regular customers, adding that her first thought was that “it sounded crazy.” Despite her initial reservations, a quick search on the internet convinced her that the idea was worth trying out. She discovered that screaming as a therapy to relieve stress is actually quite popular around the world.

J.K. Pagnutti, a researcher who studied how indigenous cultures in Canada used yelling as a form of therapy, says the results of his study reveal that yelling significantly impacts the human brain and has a positive effect on a person’s mood. Pagnutti added that, “yelling does not cost anything and is a natural process that can be carried out by any individual.”

BY MARK BABATUNDE

Pictures of a Young Barack Obama Meeting his Family in Kenya See More

Pictures of a Young Barack Obama Meeting his Family in Kenya See More




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In the face of recent accusations from President Barack Obama’s half-brother Malik, that the American president has all but abandoned his paternal family in Kenya, Face2Face Africa unearthed a video clip of a young Obama on his first visit to his father’s family’s homestead in Kogelo, Kenya. In the video, Obama can be seen presenting a middle aged woman (most likely a relative) with a jacket he apparently brought for her on his visit.

In the short video, Obama appears like someone who cares deeply about his ancestral people. Even though Obama is unable to speak the local language and the woman can neither speak or understand English, the two manage to carry on a chummy conversation with the help of a translator.

Obama first visited his paternal family in Kenya in 1987, just months before he went on to study at Harvard University. Since then, he has visited the country three times, including as a U.S. Senator and last year as president. Obama barely knew his father growing up and most of the memories he has about him only coming from narratives he could piece together from close relatives. Despite his disconnect with Obama Sr., he has still managed to forge an amazing connection with his paternal roots.

Sibling Rivalry

Ahead of the third and final U.S. presidential election debate on October 20th, President Obama’s half-brother, Malik Obama, announced his support for republican candidate Donald Trump, adding that he would be attending the debate as his guest in what was clearly an attempt to antagonize his distant sibling.

While it is not exactly clear when or why relations between the two brothers soured, it’s obvious that Malik is bitter and resentful. He has repeatedly criticized President Obama for doing little or nothing to support the extended Obama family back in Kenya.

In an interview with the New York Post, Malik claimed that President Obama was unwilling to support a foundation Malik had started in their late father’s name. “My brother didn’t help me at all,” he said adding that “he wanted me to shut it down when I set it up.”

Relations between the two have not always been frosty. In fact, Malik was the best man at President Obama’s wedding to Michelle in 1992. Obama would later return the favor at Malik’s wedding. In addition, several picture records of the Obama family show the two had at one time enjoyed a close relationship.

In 2013, following his half-brother’s second successful presidential campaign, Malik attempted to cash in on the Obama brand by making a run for the governor of Siaya, the district where the Obama family is from.

BY MARK BABATUNDE

Under Gaddafi, Libya was one of the very few countries that didnt have any National debt Read More

Under Gaddafi, Libya was one of the very few countries that didnt have any National debt Read More





Under Gaddafi, Libya was one of the very few countries that didnt have any National debt. Libya had surplus on budget and had gold stock that would last them generations. After NATO killed him, all the gold from Libyan reserve were taken by the european union, while over 50 heads of states in African Union which was fully funded by Gaddafi stood and watched.

Ethnic Basari Virgin dancers from Togo in their cultural outfit and…Read More

Ethnic Basari Virgin dancers from Togo in their cultural outfit and…Read More




Ethnic Basari Virgin dancers from Togo in their cultural outfit and holding calabashes as they enter the grounds of the "Festivals Des Divinites Noires" (The Festival of Black Deities) at a Aneho in Togo.
The Festival of Black Deities ("Festivals Des Divinites Noires") was established in 2006 by Acofin organization . It is for meetings, exchanges, training, transmission, exploration and groundbreaking discoveries. Initially its concentration was to give priority to traditional religions and initiation societies. This is because Africa is full of many initiation societies.




Among the most famous are men leopards in Democratic Congo, the Dogon of Mali, Poro initiation among the Senoufo people of Ivory Coast, Burkina Faso and Mali, the Mossi of Burkina - Faso, the Fang of Gabon, the Kondonas Pya Togo etc
For seven years the Festival of Black Deities always opens at Glidji. Glidji is a 10-minute drive from Aného. Glidji is the undisputed "Temple of traditional religions." Nicknamed the "Vatican" of voodoo, Glidji is famous for its temples, monasteries, its high priests, her priestesses, the sacred forest where there come that insiders in a state of purity.

Ethnic Turkana girls in their traditional dress and trademark neads on their neck carrying their wares to market at..Read More

Ethnic Turkana girls in their traditional dress and trademark neads on their neck carrying their wares to market at..Read More




Ethnic Turkana girls in their traditional dress and trademark neads on their neck carrying their wares to market at Lodwar in Kenya. Turkana people are agro-pastoralist Nilotic people native to the Turkana District in northwest Kenya, a semi-arid climate region bordering Lake Turkana in the east, Pokot, Rendille and Samburu to the south, Uganda to the west, and South Sudan and Ethiopia to the north. They refer to their land as Turkan.
Traditionally, men and women both wear wraps made of rectangular woven materials and animal skins. Today these cloths are normally purchased, having been manufactured in Nairobi or elsewhere in Kenya. Often men wear their wraps similar to tunics, with one end connected with the other end over the right shoulder, and carry wrist knives made of steel and goat hide.



Men also carry stools (known as ekicholong) and will use these for simple chairs rather than sitting on the hot midday sand. These stools also double as headrests, keeping one's head elevated from the sand, and protecting any ceremonial head decorations from being damaged. It is also not uncommon for men to carry several staves; one is used for walking and balance when carrying loads; the other, usually slimmer and longer, is used to prod livestock during herding activities.
Women will customarily wear necklaces, and will shave their hair completely which often has beads attached to the loose ends of hair. Men wear their hair shaved. Women wear two pieces of cloth, one being wrapped around the waist while the other covers the top. Traditionally leather wraps covered with ostrich egg shell beads were the norm for women's undergarments, though these are now uncommon in many areas.
The Turkana people have elaborate clothing and adornment styles. Clothing is used to distinguish between age groups, development stages, occasions and status of individuals or groups in the Turkana community.
Today, many Turkana have adopted western-style clothing. This is especially prominent among both men and women who live in town centers throughout Turkana

UNADULTERATED DARK SKIN Two beautiful Togolese girls showcasing unique beads..Read More

UNADULTERATED DARK SKIN Two beautiful Togolese girls showcasing unique beads..Read More




UNADULTERATED DARK SKIN: Two beautiful Togolese girls showcasing unique beads during the "Festivals Des Divinites Noires" (The Festival of Black Deities) at a Aneho in Togo.
The Festival of Black Deities ("Festivals Des Divinites Noires") was established in 2006 by Acofin organization . It is for meetings, exchanges, training, transmission, exploration and groundbreaking discoveries. Initially its concentration was to give priority to traditional religions and initiation societies.



This is because Africa is full of many initiation societies. Among the most famous are men leopards in Democratic Congo, the Dogon of Mali, Poro initiation among the Senoufo people of Ivory Coast, Burkina Faso and Mali, the Mossi of Burkina - Faso, the Fang of Gabon, the Kondonas Pya Togo etc
For seven years the Festival of Black Deities always opens at Glidji. Glidji is a 10-minute drive from Aného. Glidji is the undisputed "Temple of traditional religions." Nicknamed the "Vatican" of voodoo, Glidji is famous for its temples, monasteries, its high priests, her priestesses, the sacred forest where there come that insiders in a state of purity.